Monday, May 27, 2024
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King Levi: “The ASAS Project is the new needle for fashion in Mozambique”

Levi Maluvele or simply King Levi, is a young entrepreneur, creative director and CEO of the prestigious fashion agency KLD AGENCY, in Mozambique, and of VICIOUS SHOES.

In this conversation, King Levi, who is also a board member of Superbrands Mozambique, reflects on the current state of the fashion sector in Mozambique.

The interview is very interesting and gives us real tips on investment opportunities with high profitability potential. Be sure to read to the end!

Profile Mozambique: What assessment can we make of the current state of fashion in Mozambique?

King Levi: Unfortunately, we are not yet at a level where we can highlight a consolidated fashion industry. About eight years ago, we created Fancy Africa, one of the largest fashion platforms in Mozambique. However, we felt the need to create more initiatives. This year, we launched the ASAS project, focused on training and developing fashion designers.

We are developing various initiatives, such as opportunities for models and international collaborations. Last year, we sent designers to Brazil, Nigeria and other countries. This April, we’ll be in Paris. Our aim is to create a talent development network not only outside the country, but also within it. In addition, we have the ambition and mission to open a fabric factory in Mozambique.

Profile Mozambique: What assessment can we make of the current state of fashion in Mozambique?

King Levi: Unfortunately, we are not yet at a level where we can highlight a consolidated fashion industry. About eight years ago, we created Fancy Africa, one of the largest fashion platforms in Mozambique. However, we felt the need to create more initiatives. This year, we launched the ASAS project, focused on training and developing fashion designers.

We are developing various initiatives, such as opportunities for models and international collaborations. Last year, we sent designers to Brazil, Nigeria and other countries. This April, we’ll be in Paris. Our aim is to create a talent development network not only outside the country, but also within it. In addition, we have the ambition and mission to open a fabric factory in Mozambique.

P.M: The fashion world in Mozambique is still facing a number of challenges to its stability, in this scenario, can we consider it a breeding ground for investment?

K.L: Fashion in Mozambique is full of talent and creativity. However, we face significant challenges, such as a lack of funding opportunities and limited access to local raw materials.

Investing in the weaving industry could be the key to overcoming these obstacles. By developing and strengthening fabric production locally, not only could we value the country’s resources, but we could also create a favorable environment for growth and innovation in Mozambican fashion.

P.M: Fashion Week is one of the great milestones in this sector, in practical terms, how can we describe it?

K.L: Fashion Week is a unique opportunity for Mozambicans to explore their creative potential and develop their skills. It’s an environment where they can interact with other professionals in the sector, exchange experiences and hone their skills.

Taking part in this event not only provides visibility for local talent, but also opens doors to opportunities for growth and development, both nationally and internationally. It is a space for constant learning, where participants can not only show their work, but also learn from others and expand their creative horizons.

In addition, Fashion Week is also a sales opportunity, where creators have the chance to market their pieces and expand their business. It’s an event that boosts the fashion industry in Mozambique, highlighting local creativity and talent to the world.

P.M: We know that King Levi is in charge of the ASAS project. What are the points of attention and what is the focus of the project?

K.L: The project is focused on developing skills and promoting self-employment. Our intention is to train a class of people who will not just sew, but will become stylists. At the end of the course, each student will acquire a sewing machine, allowing for continued practice and development of their skills after training. What happens is that many people have sewing skills, but rarely have access to machines. In the course, we will not only offer learning, but the tools needed to start your own business.

P.M: What are the requirements for taking part in the project?

K.L: If you like fashion, have an appreciation for the world of creation, joining the project is a must. Registration is simple: just go to the Fancy Africa website and check out the link. The project is periodic and is about to start its first class, which will last an intense week.

For the duration of the course, we will be joined by international trainers. These partnerships allow us to bring in experienced professionals, enriching the program with different perspectives and experiences. Multicultural exchange is fundamental to the development of fashion.

P.M: What are your plans and expectations for this year?

K.L: We’re off to a great start this year. We’ve already had Fancy Summer, which took place on February 24th. In a few weeks’ time, I’m going to France and I’m going to produce a fashion event in Paris, where I’ll be able to take some Mozambican designers and some who are part of my platform. We’ll also have Fancy Africa in September, and I’ll also be producing Africa Fashion Week in November. So it’s going to be an extremely intense year full of hard work.

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